12.5 — The Virtual Table

URL: https://www.learncpp.com/cpp-tutorial/the-virtual-table/?utm_source=pocket_mylist

To implement virtual functions, C++ uses a special form of late binding known as the virtual table. The virtual table is a lookup table of functions used to resolve function calls in a dynamic/late binding manner. The virtual table sometimes goes by other names, such as “vtable”, “virtual function table”, “virtual method table”, or “dispatch table”.

First, every class that uses virtual functions (or is derived from a class that uses virtual functions) is given its own virtual table. This table is simply a static array that the compiler sets up at compile time. A virtual table contains one entry for each virtual function that can be called by objects of the class. Each entry in this table is simply a function pointer that points to the most-derived function accessible by that class.

Second, the compiler also adds a hidden pointer that is a member of the base class, which we will call *__vptr. *__vptr is set (automatically) when a class object is created so that it points to the virtual table for that class. Unlike the *this pointer, which is actually a function parameter used by the compiler to resolve self-references, *__vptr is a real pointer. Consequently, it makes each class object allocated bigger by the size of one pointer. It also means that *__vptr is inherited by derived classes, which is important.

The virtual table for Base objects is simple. An object of type Base can only access the members of Base. Base has no access to D1 or D2 functions. Consequently, the entry for function1 points to Base::function1() and the entry for function2 points to Base::function2().

The virtual table for D1 is slightly more complex. An object of type D1 can access members of both D1 and Base. However, D1 has overridden function1(), making D1::function1() more derived than Base::function1(). Consequently, the entry for function1 points to D1::function1(). D1 hasn’t overridden function2(), so the entry for function2 will point to Base::function2().

Note that because dPtr is a base pointer, it only points to the Base portion of d1. However, also note that *__vptr is in the Base portion of the class, so dPtr has access to this pointer. Finally, note that dPtr->__vptr points to the D1 virtual table! Consequently, even though dPtr is of type Base, it still has access to D1’s virtual table (through __vptr).

First, the program recognizes that function1() is a virtual function. Second, the program uses dPtr->__vptr to get to D1’s virtual table. Third, it looks up which version of function1() to call in D1’s virtual table. This has been set to D1::function1(). Therefore, dPtr->function1() resolves to D1::function1()!

In this case, when b is created, __vptr points to Base’s virtual table, not D1’s virtual table. Consequently, bPtr->__vptr will also be pointing to Base’s virtual table. Base’s virtual table entry for function1() points to Base::function1(). Thus, bPtr->function1() resolves to Base::function1(), which is the most-derived version of function1() that a Base object should be able to call.